Why is reading important for students by netlinehost

 Why is reading important for students

The first thing I'd look for if I came to your house would be your bookcase. Yes, because it says a lot about you.

People who collect books have better human relationships than those who do not. Yes, since books teach us a great deal.


Why is reading important for students
Why is reading important for students



Get a storey book and observe how the characters in the storey act. They may be in a constant war with their inner demons in order to achieve the top rung of the ladder, such as a job, business, or other endeavour. Yes, pride, envy, jealousy, and other negative emotions could be a painful reality about themselves. Learning how they dealt with them and overcame them is something we can do when we are going through similar difficulties. To be labelled as well-adjusted people, we must be kind, kind, fair, and just. Because we live with other people, we must be easy to get along with, understand our boundaries, and be willing to learn a thing or two about relating. And reading books is a surefire approach to develop the necessary abilities for coping with other people. The importance of vicarious learning cannot be overstated. When you read about a book character being the brunt of jokes, or being mocked, or anything, you tend to connect with them. You are aware that doing so or receiving such treatment is not a good idea. Thank you to the books I've read!



Only a handful of my students have reading resources at home, according to a survey I conducted with them. They don't have any books other than the textbooks that the school provides for students to read during the school year. This is extremely concerning, given the importance of book reading to a child's development of comprehension skills, fluency, and vocabulary, as well as his or her appreciation of human dynamics in which people have different personalities, beliefs, and so on, resulting in different action-reactions to a given issue, and so on.



Later on, young minds must be moulded into well-rounded individuals. They must have absorbed wisdom from the great books around them, and they must be more sensitive and empathic to all, including those with whom they have no direct touch. Biases and hostility for some people remain despite the fact that they are irrational. This is due to a lack of a habit of reading books and learning the mechanics of constructive social relationships.



Those who are wide and wild readers are silent and easier to be around, and they can understand one's uniqueness without bias or prejudice. That is the core of reading books: we become more understanding, supportive, and so on to those around us as a result of them.



There are, however, always exceptions to the rule: some of us have the audacity to prejudice someone. Even those who are ostensibly educated. Yes, true education is measured by how you treat others outside of your immediate circle; how you treat them is your own brand of social adjustment: treat people well to demonstrate your learned behaviour gleaned from a variety of readings, experiences, and other sources.



So, the next time I come to see you, please provide coffee or tea... and a book that you've already read a dozen times! I might get some wisdom from it and become a better person than I was before. Just joking!



Nabiong, Larry Icabandi



Among other amazing endeavours, I've been a grade school teacher, published author/article writer, grape nook farmer, environment/IP supporter, and social entrepreneur want tobe.



When Doors Open... Run! is the working title of his debut novel, which he is currently working on. Players are placed against one other inside an arena with many doors for them to race toward or away... for survival purposes, similar to the Hunger Games. Enemies, like them, are hiding behind closed doors, attempting to survive the odds. When he or she approaches the final door in front of the clapping onlookers, only the toughest will emerge victorious!



The first thing I'd look for if I came to your house would be your bookcase. Yes, because it says a lot about you.



People who collect books have better human relationships than those who do not. Yes, since books teach us a great deal.



Get a storey book and observe how the characters in the storey act. They may be in a constant war with their inner demons in order to achieve the top rung of the ladder, such as a job, business, or other endeavour. Yes, pride, envy, jealousy, and other negative emotions could be a painful reality about themselves. Learning how they dealt with them and overcame them is something we can do when we are going through similar difficulties. To be labelled as well-adjusted people, we must be kind, kind, fair, and just. Because we live with other people, we must be easy to get along with, understand our boundaries, and be willing to learn a thing or two about relating. And reading books is a surefire approach to develop the necessary abilities for coping with other people. The importance of vicarious learning cannot be overstated. When you read about a book character being the brunt of jokes, or being mocked, or anything, you tend to connect with them. You are aware that doing so or receiving such treatment is not a good idea. Thank you to the books I've read!



Only a handful of my students have reading resources at home, according to a survey I conducted with them. They don't have any books other than the textbooks that the school provides for students to read during the school year. This is extremely concerning, given the importance of book reading to a child's development of comprehension skills, fluency, and vocabulary, as well as his or her appreciation of human dynamics in which people have different personalities, beliefs, and so on, resulting in different action-reactions to a given issue, and so on.



Later on, young minds must be moulded into well-rounded individuals. They must have absorbed wisdom from the great books around them, and they must be more sensitive and empathic to all, including those with whom they have no direct touch. Biases and hostility for some people remain despite the fact that they are irrational. This is due to a lack of a habit of reading books and learning the mechanics of constructive social relationships.



Those who are wide and wild readers are silent and easier to be around, and they can understand one's uniqueness without bias or prejudice. That is the core of reading books: we become more understanding, supportive, and so on to those around us as a result of them.



There are, however, always exceptions to the rule: some of us have the audacity to prejudice someone. Even those who are ostensibly educated. Yes, true education is measured by how you treat others outside of your immediate circle; how you treat them is your own brand of social adjustment: treat people well to demonstrate your learned behaviour gleaned from a variety of readings, experiences, and other sources.



So, the next time I come to see you, please provide coffee or tea... and a book that you've already read a dozen times! I might get some wisdom from it and become a better person than I was before. Just joking!



Nabiong, Larry Icabandi



Among other amazing endeavours, I've been a grade school teacher, published author/article writer, grape nook farmer, environment/IP supporter, and social entrepreneur want tobe.



When Doors Open... Run! is the working title of his debut novel, which he is currently working on. Players are placed against one other inside an arena with many doors for them to race toward or away... for survival purposes, similar to the Hunger Games. Enemies, like them, are hiding behind closed doors, attempting to survive the odds. When he or she approaches the final door in front of the clapping onlookers, only the toughest will emerge victoriously!

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